BCC Wins Best Practice Award from EAGLE Commission

BCC-wins-best-practice-award-2019-eagle-commissionFrom Left to right:  Robert Kelly (Board Chair), Laurie Anne Spagnola (President & CEO), Nicole Smith (Executive Director of MD & DC Programs), Bob Kimmons (Board Member), Kevin Gralley (Vice Chair)

BCC Wins Best Practice Award from EAGLE Commission

For Immediate Release

Contact:
Kristian Sekse
Chief Operating Officer
(443) 845-4395 (cell)
ksekse@boardofchildcare.org

BALTIMORE, MARYLAND – February 19, 2019. Board of Child Care announced today it had received a best practice award from the EAGLE Accreditation Commission.  The best practice award is given to organizations doing standard practices in an outstanding way.

Summary of the Nomination

In 2016 a tragedy occurred at a Delaware residential program that took the life of a young lady from Maryland. This prompted the expedited, targeted removal of all MD youth from that facility. The programming needs of these youth were considerably outside the traditional profile served by BCC at the time. Eleven youth ultimately transferred to BCC because of the tragedy, and with the knowledge that significant challenges were expected to serve these young people and their families, BCC sprang into action.

Staff learned skills such as Applied Behavioral Analysis (ABA), Therapeutic Crisis Intervention for the Developmentally Delayed individuals (TCI – DD), and were retrained to collect new types of behavioral and environmental data. Major investments in the facilities such as safe, non-breakable windows and calming rooms were made. As the new program progressed its data was tracked and, ultimately, showed very positive outcomes for some of the youth who were previously not considered to be able to be served by any Maryland provider.

In the end being closer to family, combined with a deep focus on prescribed medications and behavior management drove better treatment outcomes. Big picture, the event in Delaware and BCC’s adaptations to its high intensity residential program made an impact at the state level. The State of Maryland released a Request for Proposal that utilized the hard work of BCC as the framework for new programming offered in state. BCC responded to the opportunity in 2018 and is still anxiously waiting the awarding of the contract to serve Emotional, Cognitive and Developmentally Delayed youth and their families.

What outcomes or benefits came from this practice or program?

Kids with complex problems and treatment needs were able to be served in the state in which they live. Being closer to family drove better treatment outcomes. BCC was able to respond to the State of Maryland in their time of need. BCC shared this practice, and our learning with some of our United Methodist partners from different states like WV and GA. BCC developed more capacity to serve some of the state’s most vulnerable youth.

Why is this considered a best practice?

Working with complex trauma is something very few organizations do or do well. During the research phase BCC traveled to providers in California and Oregon widely considered the best in this space. The way BCC prepared to serve this newer, more acute population is a best practice because what was learned from the leading agencies in this space was applied to the new program structure. The results of our data collection drove a new program offering by the state of Maryland.

Disclosure:

BCC’s President & CEO, Laurie Anne Spagnola, was at the time of this award a board member of the United Methodist Association (UMA), the not-for-profit that oversees EAGLE accreditation. However, Ms. Spagnola was not a member of the selection committee nor was she privy to conversations during deliberations for the award. 

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Thomas L. Curcio, former President/CEO and youth advocate passes away.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contact: Kristian Sekse
(443) 845-4395 (cell)
ksekse@boardofchildcare.org

BOARD OF CHILD CARE ANNOUNCES THE PASSING OF THOMAS L. CURCIO, FORMER PRESIDENT/CEO

Baltimore, Md. – August 23, 2017 – “On behalf of the Board of Child Care (BCC) Board of Directors, our employees, and program alumni, it is with deep sorrow that we announce the unexpected passing of Thomas Curcio,” stated Guy Everhart, chair of the board of directors.  “Our hearts and prayers are with the Curcio family.” Mr. Curcio, passed away August 22, 2017.

Mr. Curcio started his career in the field of child welfare more than 45 years ago.  In 1993, he took over as executive director (later becoming president and CEO) of the Board of Child Care and led BCC through remarkable growth. When Mr. Curcio assumed his leadership post, BCC had an annual budget of just $3 million and served 50 youth on one campus. Upon his retirement on June 30, 2014, the organization spanned Maryland, West Virginia, and the District of Columbia and served hundreds of children and young adults annually.

During Mr. Curcio’s leadership the Board of Child Care received several honors including Organization of the Year Award and Best Practice Award for Innovative Programming from the United Methodist Association. In 2009 Mr. Curcio was named Administrator of the Year by the same association. A year prior, he received the Samuel Gerson Nordlinger Child Welfare Leadership Award from the Alliance for Children and Families.

An Ellicott City resident, Mr. Curcio graduated from Gannon University in 1967 with a bachelor’s degree in sociology. He held both a master’s in criminal justice from Long Island University and a master’s in social work from Hunter College, School of Social Work.

Family and friends may call at the Candle Light Funeral Home by Craig Witzke for a memorial gathering on Friday, 6-8pm. Services and Interment private. For further information and/or to post condolences, please visit www.candlelightfuneralhome.com

About the Board of Child Care

The Board of Child Care has a long history of serving children and families in the community.  The organization began as three United Methodist orphanages that opened in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, which later merged in 1960 to become the Board of Child Care.

Today, the Board of Child Care’s $32 million annual budget provides programs that enrich communities, one family at a time.  It offers residential treatment, mental health, special and early learning educational programs, and community-based programs throughout the Mid-Atlantic.  To see a map of all program locations and descriptions of each BCC program, visit boardofchildcare.org.

 

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Alternative Learning Program Launches in Martinsburg

2017-03-17 Alternative Learning Program Signing - Key Players

From left to right: Charles Hampton, Jacob Green, Jason Wright, Laurie Anne Spagnola, Don Dellinger, Jackie Columbia

 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Contact: Kristian Sekse
443-845-4395 (cell)
ksekse@boardofchildcare.org

PUBLIC PRIVATE PARTNERSHIP LAUNCHES ALTERNATIVE LEARNING PROGRAM IN MARTINSBURG

Martinsburg, WV – March 16, 2017 – The Board of Child Care (BCC) has launched a brand-new educational program in Berkley County in partnership with three West Virginia state agencies.
Called the Alternative Learning Program (ALP), its goal is to reduce recidivism rates by providing full-day educational and therapeutic services for middle and high school students (males and females). The program is staffed to handle a maximum capacity of 17 students and is expecting to begin services later in March.

Kickoff for the program was held on Thursday, March 16, at BCC’s Martinsburg campus. The event included the signing of a Memorandum of Understanding between all the partners as well as a roundtable discussion with attendees from various West Virginia state agencies.

This program is a public-private partnership between the Board of Child Care, Division of Juvenile Services (DJS), Berkeley County Schools (BCS), West Virginia Department of Education (WVDE), and the Office of Diversion and Transition Program (ODTP).

Signatories of the MOU from each partner (from left to right):

  • Jason Wright, Director of Community Based Services, DJS
  • Jacob Green, Special Assistant to the Chief Career and Technical Education Officer at WVDE, Office of Diversion and Transition Programs.
  • Laurie Anne Spagnola, President & CEO, Board of Child Care
  • Don Dellinger, Deputy Superintendent, Berkeley County Schools

Other key players:

  • Charles Hampton, Principal, Board of Child Care Martinsburg School
  • Jackie Columbia, Director of West Virginia Services, Board of Child Care

The idea for the program is to offer an expanded array of educational and therapeutic services not being delivered in the sixteen current Youth Reporting Centers (YRC) throughout the state of West Virginia. There are several key differences between the two program models.

First, youth in the ALP will attend BCC’s school on the Martinsburg campus (some but not all YRC programs provide educational services directly). The school is already serving the approximately 20 youth living in BCC’s residential program on the property. Its teachers (licensed and provided by WVDE) and its behavior support staff (trained and provided by BCC) are already familiar with the needs of youth who have experienced trauma, incarceration, or who have a mental health diagnosis.

The ALP will use existing staffing and classrooms within the school and will not require additional positions unless the program expands in size. BCC’s residential youth and the ALP day-students will learn together and will not be taught separately.

Secondly, the delivery of mental health services using an outpatient model is enhanced from what is currently available to this youth population. BCC’s licensed, masters-level clinicians will deliver supportive counseling services, individual therapy, and specialty therapy groups to address everything from substance abuse to coping with complex trauma.

Finally, the public-private partnership between the three WV state agencies and BCC will expand the ALP’s target population over what is typically served by a YRC. Referrals to the program are broken up into three segments or populations: probation officers and judges, Berkeley County Schools, and youth who are discharging from a WV residential treatment center.

  • Probation officers can refer to this program and youth will be ordered into the program by a judge. This serves as an alternative sentence to incarceration, keeps a youth’s community supports and family nearby, and is much cheaper for the state of WV as incarceration is expensive.
  • Berkeley County Schools will be able to refer youth to the program who have a mental health diagnosis. While these students are eager to learn and succeed they find the large, traditional public school setting difficult and would be better served in a smaller classroom. Again, this keeps the students local but provides them with the additional support they need to succeed.
  • The third group are youth who were in residential placements in other parts of WV and are being discharged back to homes in the Berkeley County area. Instead of sending them home and back to public school immediately, they will return home and utilize the ALP to get more individualized attention and treatment services before transitioning to public school. The ALP is focused on reducing recidivism rates, and by including a step-down placement in the treatment plan of that youth provides more therapeutic supports around prior to their transition back to public school.

BCC has two program locations in Martinsburg, WV that provide therapeutic residential treatment services to youth from WV. On the larger campus, youth live and go to school on the 20+ acre property. At the Martinsburg group homes youth attend public school during the day.

The Board of Child Care has a long history of serving children and families in the community. The organization began as three United Methodist orphanages that opened in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, which later merged in 1960 to become the Board of Child Care. BCC’s operations expanded from Maryland to West Virginia in 2001.

Today, the Board of Child Care’s $27 million annual budget provides programs that enrich communities, one family at a time. It offers residential treatment, mental health, educational, and community-based programs throughout the Mid-Atlantic. To see a map of all program locations and descriptions of each BCC program, visit boardofchildcare.org.

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PARTNERSHIP BETWEEN BCC & BLUE RIDGE COMMUNITY AND TECHNICAL COLLEGE NOW PROVIDING TUTORS FOR FOSTER CARE YOUTH

blue-ridge-community-technical-college-tutors
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contact: Kristian Sekse
443-845-4395 (cell)
ksekse@boardofchildcare.org

Martinsburg, WV – October 17, 2016 – The Board of Child Care’s (BCC) West Virginia programs have partnered with Blue Ridge Community and Technical College (Blue Ridge CTC) to provide tutors for youth served by BCC.

Blue Ridge CTC student tutors are education majors who are taking a class that requires at least ten hours of face to face experience with at-risk youth. The Blue Ridge CTC students will provide one to two hours tutoring weekly from October through December. Cumulatively over 200 hours of tutoring will be provided for the approximately 25 young adults living at BCC’s WV programs.

This is the first partnership between BCC and Blue Ridge CTC. Orientation for the 18 Blue Ridge CTC student tutors was held on September 26 at BCC. The student tutors received a tour of the campus and an overview of the therapy and programing offered by BCC.

“It is absolutely wonderful to have tutors coming in to help our youth,” said Jackie Columbia, Director of WV Operations for BCC. “We hope that Blue Ridge CTC will make tutoring at BCC part of the curriculum each year. It’s such a wonderful resource for our youth especially so early in the school year. It really gives them some momentum and confidence heading into the second semester.”

BCC has two program locations in Martinsburg, WV and both serve foster care youth in WV. On the larger campus youth live and go to school on the property. At the group homes youth attend public school during the day. Blue Ridge CTC student tutors will volunteer at both program locations.

The Board of Child Care has a long history of serving children and families in the community. The organization began as three United Methodist orphanages that opened in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, which later merged in 1960 to become the Board of Child Care. BCC’s operations expanded from Maryland to West Virginia in 2001.

Today, the Board of Child Care’s $27 million annual budget provides programs to enrich communities, one family at a time. It offers residential, mental health, educational, and therapeutic counseling services across Maryland, West Virginia, and the District of Columbia. To see a map of all program locations and descriptions of each BCC program, visit www.boardofchildcare.org.

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PRESS RELEASE: GRADUATIONS 2016

BOARD OF CHILD CARE CELEBRATES THE GRADUATIONS OF 20 STUDENTS AND PROGRAM PARTICIPANTS WITH 4 CEREMONIES SPANNING 3 CAMPUSES.

The following press releases were sent to local newsgathering partners and campuses June 27, 2016. Readers will find graduation information from Baltimore, Strawbridge School, Martinsburg, WV and Denton, MD.

2016 BCC Graduation Releases 2016-07-11

For any additional information, please contact Mr. Kristian Sekse, V.P of Communications, at 443-845-4395 (cell). Additionally, readers can email Board of Child Care’s Communications Dept. at communications@boardofchildcare.org.

About Board of Child Care

Enriching communities, one family at a time, BCC’s $27 million annual budget provides programs across the Mid-Atlantic. Offerings include residential care, treatment foster care, early childhood education, therapeutic counseling, adoption information and referral, and a special education school. Headquartered in Baltimore, BCC operates facilities and group homes throughout Maryland and the Eastern Shore, West Virginia, and the District of Columbia.

To learn more, visit www.boardofchildcare.org.

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PRESS RELEASE: ELP PROGRAM IN D.C. EARNS NAEYC ACCREDITATION

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Contact: Kristian Sekse
443-845-4395 (C)
ksekse@boardofchildcare.org

WASHINGTON, D.C. – June 27, 2016 — The Board of Child Care’s Early Learning Program, located in the Southeast (SE) quadrant of Washington, D.C., has earned accreditation from the National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC) – the nation’s leading organization of early childhood centers.

This approval follows the Board of Child Care’s certification in February from the Commission on Accreditation of Rehabilitation Facilities (CARF) and last month’s license for the West Virginia campus in Martinsburg to offer Functional Family Therapy (FFT).

BCC REPORT CARD W MEAN SCORE NAEYCBCC earned outstanding scores within the 10 NAEYC program standards the ELP was judged and evaluated upon. NAEYC awarded BCC 100 percent marks in five categories, 96 percent or better in two other standards, giving BCC a mean score of 95.8!

“NAEYC is the gold standard and recognized nationally for quality early learning programs like ours,” said Cora Jackson, Assistant Program Director of the DC ELP. “It says that our program is a place where all children can learn, grow and thrive, because of our exciting and rich learning environments, nurturing, engaging, and knowledgeable teaching staff, and committed families.”

The NAEYC certificate, conferred June 6, 2016, is valid through July 1, 2021. The certificate is based upon evaluated proficiency in 10 program standards, each group or classroom observed during a site visit, as well as all candidacy and other required criteria. The required criteria include scoring 80 percent or better for each program standard and 70 percent or better for each classroom or group observed.

“What these numbers tell me is we’re very successful at what we do and justifies why we have a waiting list to get into the program in DC,” said Laurie Anne Spagnola, BCC’s President and CEO. “It also means we have some outstanding programming in place to enrich the children and families we serve, and that is most important.”

To earn NAEYC accreditation, the Board of Child Care went through an extensive self-study process, measuring the program and its services against 10 NAEYC Early Childhood Program Standards and more than 400 related accreditation criteria. Additionally, NAEYC assessors conducted an on-site visit. NAEYC-accredited programs are also subject to unannounced visits during their five-year accreditation.

In the 25 years since NAEYC Accreditation was established, it has become a widely recognized sign of high quality early childhood education. NAEYC validates 7,000 programs, or just approximately eight percent of all preschools and other early childhood programs.

About the Board of Child Care

Enriching communities, one family at a time, BCC’s $27 million annual budget provides programs across the Mid-Atlantic. Offerings include residential care, treatment foster care, early childhood education, therapeutic counseling, adoption information and referral, and a special education school. Headquartered in Baltimore, BCC operates facilities and group homes throughout Maryland and the Eastern Shore, WV and D.C.

To learn more, visit www.boardofchildcare.org.

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PRESS RELEASE: SPAGNOLA NAMED PRESIDENT

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Contact: Kristian Sekse
443-845-4395
communications@boardofchildcare.org

Baltimore, Md. – July 17, 2014 – The board of directors of the Board of Child Care (BCC) has named Laurie Anne Spagnola the nonprofit’s new president. Spagnola leads the organization in its efforts to serve children and families who require physical, emotional, behavioral and social support.

Spagnola becomes just the fourth president in the Board of Child Care’s 140-year history. She succeeds Thomas L. Curcio, who retired June 30, after serving the organization for 21 years.

Spagnola is a seasoned nonprofit executive who has provided leadership for child welfare and human services organizations for more than 25 years. She has an extensive track record of growing operational budgets and making critical community connections.

Jan Hayden, chair of the Board of Child Care’s board of directors, said, “We’re delighted to announce Laurie Anne’s appointment as president. Her energy, drive and experience make her the ideal person to lead the organization into the future. The board is confident the organization’s programs and services for children, youth and their families will grow under Laurie Anne’s guidance and vision.”

Prior to arriving at the Board of Child Care, Spagnola spent 12 years as President of York Children’s Home, in York County, Pa. The nonprofit provides comprehensive, accredited, community-based services to stabilize and strengthen children and families in need. During her time as President she grew the annual budget from $3 million to over $10 million and oversaw a tremendous growth in staff, which now number more than 135 individuals serving over 2,000 children annually.

“The Board of Child Care is a solid, very well-run operation,” Spagnola said. “I look forward to taking this foundation and providing more services for those who need our help. We are well poised to expand our leadership role in the field of child welfare by ensuring that children, families, and their communities facing challenging circumstances have a chance to heal and ultimately lead healthy, productive lives.”

A York, Pa., resident, Spagnola graduated from Millersville University with a bachelor’s degree in social work and a minor in Spanish. She holds both a master’s degree in social work from Fordham University and a certificate in executive leadership from Michigan University. Spagnola is active in the community and has invested her time volunteering for numerous charitable boards. She is currently completing terms on the boards of the Alliance for Children and Families, York Hospital and the regional board of Susquehanna Bank.

About the Board of Child Care

The Board of Child Care has a long history of serving children and families in the community as an outreach ministry within the Baltimore-Washington and Peninsula-Delaware Conferences of the United Methodist Church (UMC). The agency began as three orphanages that opened in the late 19th and early 20th centuries and then merged in 1960 to become the Board of Child Care.

Today, the Board of Child Care’s $27 million annual budget provides programs that include residential care, treatment foster care, early childhood education, therapeutic counseling, adoption information and referral, and a special education school. The agency is headquartered in Baltimore but also operates facilities in West Virginia, the Eastern Shore of Maryland and in the District of Columbia. Its community-based group homes are located throughout Maryland and in Martinsburg, W.Va. To learn more, visit www.boardofchildcare.org.
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BOARD OF CHILD CARE NAMES SPAGNOLA PRESIDENT 07-14-2014

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